Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Viva la Revolution- November 20th- Mexico

Photos & Video
Tina Winterlik © 2012
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http://zipolitazvideoz.blogspot.mx/
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Viva La Revolution!! November 20th is Revolution Day or Dia de la Revolution en Mexico. Everyone has day off and the schools have little parades. There is nothing like being in an another country and learning about their holiday. You got to love Wikipedia to help fill in the blanks. Reading it with my child we discussed several issues surrounding it. Like the invasion of people from foreign lands (Europe) taking the land away from Indigenous people. Similar events took place in Canada and unfortunately it is still playing out all around the world. :(

Photos by Tina Winterlik © 2012

Photos by Tina Winterlik © 2012

Photos by Tina Winterlik © 2012


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_Revolution
The Mexican Revolution (Spanish: Revolución mexicana) was a major armed struggle that started in 1910, with an uprising led by Francisco I. Madero against longtime autocrat Porfirio Díaz, and lasted for the better part of a decade until around 1920. Over time the Revolution changed from a revolt against the established order to a multi-sided civil war. This armed conflict is often categorized as the most important sociopolitical event in Mexico and one of the greatest upheavals of the 20th century. Read More here Read More Here



An interesting part of the Wikipeda page is about the Zapatistas and the Zapatista women. Now I have a better understanding of how far this all goes back. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_Revolution You have to read dow near the bottom of the article.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_Revolution

Zapatista women


Women who fought alongside Zapata.
Since Zapata's political ambitions and campaign were usually local, women were able to aid the Zapatista soldiers from their homes. There were also female Zapatista soldiers who served from the beginning of the revolution. When Zapata met with President Madero on July 12, 1911, he was accompanied by his troops. Among them were female soldiers, including officers. Some women also led bandit gangs before and during the Revolution. Women joined the Zapatistas as soldiers for various reasons, including revenge for dead family members or to perform raids. Perhaps the most popular Zapatista female soldier was Margarita Neri, who was a commander. Women fought bravely as Zapatista soldiers and some were killed in battle, and long after the revolution ended many continued to wear men's clothing and carry pistols. Col. María de la Luz Espinosa Barrera was one of the few whose service was formally recognized with a pension as a veteran of the Mexican Revolution.




http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_Revolution

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